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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of microcytic anemia of juvenile chinook salmon resulting from diets deficient in vitamin E found in the catalog.

microcytic anemia of juvenile chinook salmon resulting from diets deficient in vitamin E

Cecil M. Whitmore

microcytic anemia of juvenile chinook salmon resulting from diets deficient in vitamin E

by Cecil M. Whitmore

  • 195 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Fish Commission of Oregon in Portland, Ore .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chinook salmon -- Diseases -- Nutritional aspects.,
  • Vitamin E deficiency.,
  • Vitamin E in animal nutrition.,
  • Anemia -- Nutritional aspects.

  • About the Edition

    An anemia of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is described and stages of development separated by recognizable syndromes. A vitamin E-deficient diet of low rancidity produced a severe microcytic anemia with strong immature red cell response and granulocytosis occurring 2 to 4 weeks before a drop in hemoglobin and hematocrit values. A vitamin E deficiency in association with diets of high rancidity produced a more severe anemia with impaired and delayed blood regeneration, microcytosis, abnormal red cell development, and a pronounced granulocyte response; complete recovery resulted when vitamin E was added to the diet.

    Edition Notes

    StatementCecil M. Whitmore.
    SeriesContribution / Fish Commission of Oregon -- no. 29., Contribution (Oregon. Fish Commission) -- no. 29.
    ContributionsOregon. Fish Commission.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination31 p. :
    Number of Pages31
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18221610M

      identification of juvenile salmonids and other small fishes commonly caught during field sampling of freshwater streams and lakes. Juvenile salmon sketches were adapted from sketches by the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife’s Aquatic Education Program. Photos are from ADF&G, USFS and CIAA file archives as well as personal collections. The STFWO conducts one of several salmon monitoring programs within the Central Valley that use size and date of capture to estimate race of juvenile Chinook salmon in the lower Sacramento River and Delta. The size criterion was developed by Frank Fisher (Fisher ), of CDFG in as a weekly model of Chinook salmon growth.

    Chinook salmon sexually mature between the ages of 2 and 7 but are typically 3 or 4 years old when they return to spawn. Chinook dig out gravel nests (redds) on stream bottoms where they lay their eggs. All Chinook salmon die after spawning. Young Chinook salmon feed on terrestrial and aquatic insects, amphipods, and other crustaceans. Chinook Salmon that live one year in the ocean are mostly males and will be 20 - 24" in length. Two and three-ocean fish will be considerably larger. Land-locked Chinook Salmon are stocked in several locations around Idaho to help manage Kokanee Salmon populations.

    Identification of Juvenile Salmon Small sockeye salmon can be confuse with chum salmon, however since sockeye salmon parr reside in lakes for 1 to 3 years, they are significantly larger. Chum salmon migrate to the ocean in the spring after hatching, so are not in freshwater during the summer through the winter. Distinguishing characteristics are. Johannes J.M.L. Hoffmann, Eloísa Urrechaga, Urko Aguirre, Discriminant indices for distinguishing thalassemia and iron deficiency in patients with microcytic anemia: a meta-analysis, Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), /cclm, 53, 12, ().


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Microcytic anemia of juvenile chinook salmon resulting from diets deficient in vitamin E by Cecil M. Whitmore Download PDF EPUB FB2

An anemia of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is described and stages of development separated by recognizable syndromes.

A vitamin E-deficient diet of low rancidity produced a severe microcytic anemia with strong immature red cell response and granulocytosis occurring 2 to 4 weeks before a drop in hemoglobin and hematocrit. Groups of juvenile spring chinook salmon naturally infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, were fed diets containing different levels of vitamin E and selenium for days in fresh water and days in fish were fed vitamin E at concentrations of either 53±3 mg (designated e) or ±9 mg (designated E) α Cited by:   Iron deficiency anemia: The most common cause of microcytic anemia is an iron deficiency in the blood.

Iron deficiency anemia can be caused by: inadequate iron intake, usually as a result of your diet. A microcytic anemra of juvenile chinook salmon resulting from diets defi-cient in Vitamin E. Oreg. Fish Comm' Contrib' l Dietary gill disease of trout. N.Y. State Conserv Diet experiments. A microcytic anemia of juvenile chinook salmon resulting from diets deficient in vita-min E.

Fish Comm. Oreg., Portland, Oreg. 31 p. Clinical hematology. Lea and Febiger, Philadelphia, Pa. Juvenile salmon and steelhead migrations were monitored on the Salmon, Snake, and Columbia Rivers from through and on the Snake and Columbia Rivers in (Figure 1).

Self-cleaning scoop traps were used to sample juvenile outmigrations from the Salmon. Knowledge of juvenile chinook salmon biology during their first year in the marine environment is even more limited, and nonexistent for the area south of the Cali­ fornia-Oregon border.

Healey (a) presented distribu­ tion, growth, and feeding information on first ocean-year chinook salmon in the Strait of Georgia, British Colum­ bia. Whitmore CM () A microcytic anemia of juvenile chinook salmon resulting from diets deficient in vitamin E. fish commission of Oregon Portland, Oregon.

Contribution – Google Scholar Witeska M () Stress in fish—hematological and immunological effects of heavy metals. Electron J Ichthyol – rearing of juvenile Chinook salmon, particularly in nearshore environments (Duffy et al.

In addition, when food supply is limited, dietary overlaps among species and between hatchery and wild salmon may result in intra- and interspecific competition that would reduce growth rates and overall fish size (Fisher and Pearcy ; Sturdevant.

Learning points. Iron deficiency anaemia and thalassaemia trait are the commonest causes of microcytic anaemia, but they may coexist. Serum ferritin and haemoglobin A 2 quantitation are the two most important investigations to distinguish between iron deficiency anaemia and thalassaemia trait.

Failure of iron deficiency anaemia to respond to oral iron supplementation may be. Little is known about the food habits of juvenile Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) salmon in marine environments of Alaska, or whether their diets may have contributed to extremely high marine survival rates for coho salmon from Southeast Alaska and much more modest survival rates for Southeast Alaskan Chinook salmon.

For juvenile salmon, the minimum requirement of vitamin E has been estimated as 60 mg/kg dry feed (Hamre and Lie, ), a value higher than that for other salmonids. A dietary supplement of mg/kg has been recommended as a measure to prevent oxidative damage of salmon fillet during storage, as well as to maintain optimum flesh pigmentation.

Atlantic salmon - Deficiency diseases Several nutrient deficiencies have been characterized using semi-purified diets; however, deficiency of a single nutrient is rare in farmed fish (Tab 12, 13).

In moderately severe microcytic anemia, the diagnosis of iron deficiency should only be made with a history of an iron poor diet (ages 6 to 36 months) or explained blood loss without a history and physical exam suggesting another cause.

In severe microcytic anemia consult hematology. Consider hospitalization. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fry, initial weight g, were fed a semipurified diet with 0, 15, 30, 60 or mg dl-α-tocopheryl acetate/kg.

After 24 weeks, the first two of these groups were extinct, and the fish receiving 30 mg/kg were clearly vitamin E deficient. Vitamin E deficient fish had low hemoglobin levels, characterized by a combination of reduced cellular hemoglobin. Congenital atransferrinemia or hypotransferrinemia is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by a deficiency of transferrin, resulting in hypochromic, microcytic anemia and hemosiderosis.

The authors describe a year-old Iranian girl with hypochromic microcytic anemia. The age presentation of anemia was 3 months. There was not a significant difference between the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead passing any number of dams (Pearson's chi‐squared test, χ 2 =P = ), despite differences in fish length between these species (Chinook salmon mean = mm (± SD), steelhead mean mm (± SD); Welch two sample t.

A microcytic anemia of juvenile chinook salmon resulting from diets deficient in vitamin E. Is part of: Oregon Explorer, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Public Oregon coastal salmon and steelhead tagging programs.

Chinook salmon nutrition, glycemic index, acidty and serving size Fish, salmon, chinook, cooked, dry heat *all the values are displayed for the amount of grams.

Microcytic hypochromic anemia is a type of anemia characterised by appearance of abnormally small sized red blood cells with poor oxygen carrying capacity as it has low concentration of haemoglobin.

Microcytic hypochromic anemia is mainly caused by disruption in haemoglobin and red blood cell production in the bone marrow. Know the causes, symptoms, treatment, prevention of Microcytic. Normocytic anemia can be caused by hemolysis, anemia resulting from chronic disease, or bone marrow pathology.

Macrocytic anemias are often caused by toxic agents such as alcohol, folic acid and/or vitamin B12 deficiency or, less frequently, by myelodysplastic syndrome.Predation by nonnative fishes has been identified as a contributing factor in the decline of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River basin.

We examined the diet composition of Smallmouth Bass Micropterus dolomieu and estimated the consumption and predation loss of juvenile Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Lower Granite Reservoir on the Snake River.Chinook salmon are anadromous fish, which means they can live in both fresh and saltwater.

Chinook salmon have a relatively complex life history that includes spawning and juvenile rearing in rivers followed by migrating to saltwater to feed, grow, and mature before returning to freshwater to spawn.